MRI SCANS

Our advanced 3T MRI provides the most highly detailed images in record time, while our wide bore scanners allow for optimal patient comfort and calm. 

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive test using detailed images to diagnose medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of internal body structures. MRI does not use radiation (x-rays).

Planning for your MRI procedure

Before
During
After
Before

MRI uses strong magnets, so it is important that you notify your doctor of any metal that may be implanted into your body. Jewelry should be left at home. If required, you’ll be asked to remove your watch, hearing aid, and other metal objects. Some makeup also contains traces of metal, so you might have to remove that, too. Braces and fillings normally aren’t a problem. You will be asked to change into a gown. Many clothing items contain metals that could potentially heat up and cause burns. Gowns are provided as well as secured lockers for valuables.

 

Notify your technologist if you have:

  • Any prosthetic joints, such as hip and/or knee
  • A heart pacemaker (or an artificial heart valve), a defibrillator or an artificial heart valve
  • An intrauterine device (IUD)
  • Any metal plates, pins, screws, or surgical staples in your body
  • Any previous brain surgery
  • Tattoos and permanent make-up
  • A bullet or shrapnel in your body, had metal removed from your eye or ever worked around grinding metal
  • Any possibility that you may be pregnant or suspect you may be pregnant
  • Claustrophobia and require a sedative. Please ask your referring physician to prescribe one for you

 

In many cases, patients with a pacemaker cannot have an MRI (your technologist can verify if you have a ‘safe’ pacemaker). Metal used in orthopedic surgery pose no risk during an MRI (in most cases). You will also be asked if you have ever worked with metal. If there is a possibility of metal shrapnel in the eyes, you will be asked to do an x-ray prior to the MRI.

 

Some scans require the patient to receive an injection of gadolinium: a contrast medium. If this is the case, it will be discussed with you before the procedure. This contrast medium has a lower risk of allergic reaction or kidney damage compared to other mediums commonly used for CT scans. The amount of the contrast injected is determined by the patient’s weight.

 

  • Preparation for MRI Pancreas or MRCP: Nothing by mouth for three hours prior to exam time
  • Preparation for MRI Pelvis: Drink plenty of fluids to ensure that you have a full bladder
  • Preparation for enterography: Nothing by mouth after midnight. You must arrive 45 minutes early to drink an oral contrast
During

What should I expect?

 

MRI is painless. Some patients may experience a “closed in” feeling, although in most cases, our wide bore MRI scanners have alleviated this reaction. Plan on being with us for a minimum of 30 minutes, depending on the part of the body being scanned.  You will be asked to remain still during the actual imaging process. You will hear loud tapping or thumping during the exam. Earplugs or earphones and your choice of music will be provided, if you choose.

 

Depending on the part of the body being examined, a contrast material called gadolinium may be used to enhance the visibility of certain tissues or blood vessels. A small needle is placed in your arm or hand vein and a saline solution IV drip will run through the intravenous line to prevent clotting. About two-thirds of the way into your exam, the contrast material is injected.

After

You may return to normal activities as soon as the scan is complete. The radiologist will determine if there are any areas of concern in the internal organs or bone structures. The radiologist’s interpretation will then be available to your referring physician 48 hours after the exam. In most cases, your referring physician will discuss the results with you.

For more information on this topic, please visit: Radiologyinfo.org/MRI

MRI of the Head/Brain/Neck

A head/brain/neck MRI produces detailed images of the organs, soft tissues, and bones within the head and neck region. It is effectively used for many reasons including detecting growths, infections, abnormalities of the eye or ear, congenital anomalies, abnormal bleeding, fluid build-up, certain medical conditions, vascular problems, and glandular disorders.

Detailed images of your brain and the surrounding tissues are generated in order to make a diagnosis and recommend the best treatment for your condition. In the case of migraines, cluster, or tension headaches, MRI can help rule out other medical conditions that may cause your symptoms.

MRI uses radio waves and a strong magnetic field rather than x-rays, so there is no radiation involved.

Your MRI exam may or may not require an injection of contrast material called gadolinium. Patients are much less likely to be allergic to gadolinium contrast than to iodine contrast.

If the contrast agent is used, a technologist will insert an intravenous catheter (IV line) into a vein in your hand or arm. The contrast material will be injected into the IV line after an initial series of scans, then more images are taken.

Our wide-bore scanners allow for your comfort and calm. You will be placed into the magnet of the MRI unit. The technologist will perform the exam while working at a computer outside of the room and will be in contact with you throughout the exam.

Planning for your MRI of the Head/Brain/Neck procedure

Before
During
After
Before

MRI uses strong magnets, so it is important that you notify your doctor of any metal that may be implanted into your body. Jewelry should be left at home. If required, you’ll be asked to remove your watch, hearing aid, and other metal objects. Some makeup also contains traces of metal, so you might have to remove that, too. Braces and fillings typically aren’t a problem. You will be asked to change into a gown. Many clothing items contain metals that could potentially heat up and cause burns. Gowns are provided as well as secured lockers for valuables.

 

Notify your technologist if you have:

  • Any prosthetic joints, such as hip and/or knee
  • A heart pacemaker, defibrillator or an artificial heart valve
  • An intrauterine device (IUD)
  • Any metal plates, pins, screws, or surgical staples in your body
  • Any previous brain surgery
  • Tattoos and permanent make-up
  • A bullet or shrapnel in your body, had metal removed from your eye or ever worked around grinding metal
  • Any possibility that you may be pregnant or suspect you may be pregnant
  • Claustrophobia and require a sedative. Please ask your referring physician to prescribe one for you

 

In many cases, patients with a pacemaker cannot have an MRI (your technologist can verify if you have a ‘safe’ pacemaker). Metal used in orthopedic surgery poses no risk during an MRI (in most cases). You will also be asked if you have ever worked with metal. If there is a possibility of metal shrapnel in the eyes, you will be asked to do an x-ray prior to the MRI.

 

Some scans require the patient to receive an injection of gadolinium: a contrast medium. If this is the case, it will be discussed with you before the procedure. This contrast medium has a lower risk of allergic reaction or kidney damage compared to other mediums commonly used for CT scans. The amount of the contrast injected is determined by the patient’s weight.

During

What should I expect?

MRI is painless. Some patients may experience a “closed in” feeling, although in most cases, our wide- bore MRI scanners have alleviated this reaction. Plan on being with us for a minimum of 30 minutes, depending on the part of the body being scanned.  You will be asked to remain still during the actual imaging process. You will hear loud tapping or thumping during the exam. Earplugs or earphones and your choice of music will be provided, if you choose.

 

Depending on the part of the body being examined, a contrast material called gadolinium may be used to enhance the visibility of certain tissues or blood vessels. A small needle is placed in your arm or hand vein and a saline solution IV drip will run through the intravenous line to prevent clotting. About two-thirds of the way into your exam, the contrast material is injected.

After

You may return to normal activities as soon as the scan is complete. The radiologist will determine if there are any areas of concern in the internal organs or bone structures. The radiologist’s interpretation will then be available to your referring physician in approximately 48 hours after the exam. In most cases, your referring physician will discuss the results with you.

For more information on this topic, please visit: Radiologyinfo.org Head/Brain/Neck MRI

MRI of the Heart – Coming Soon

A heart MRI, also called cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging, is used to evaluate the heart’s anatomy and to detect or monitor heart disease that has been present since birth or develops later. It is also used to detect growths, inflammation and infections as well as to measure blood flow in the heart, aorta and other large vessels.

MRI uses radio waves and a strong magnetic field rather than x-rays, so there is no radiation involved.

Your MRI exam may or may not require an injection of contrast material called gadolinium. Patients are much less likely to be allergic to gadolinium contrast than to iodine contrast.

If the contrast agent is used, a technologist will insert an intravenous catheter (IV line) into a vein in your hand or arm.  The contrast material will be injected into the IV line after an initial series of scans, then more images are taken.

Our wide-bore scanners allow for your comfort and calm. You will be placed into the magnet of the MRI unit. The technologist will perform the exam while working at a computer outside of the room and will be in contact with you throughout the exam.

Planning for your MRI of the Heart procedure

Before
During
After
Before

MRI uses strong magnets, so it is important that you notify your doctor of any metal that may be implanted into your body. Jewelry should be left at home. If required, you’ll be asked to remove your watch, hearing aid, and other metal objects. Some makeup also contains traces of metal, so you might have to remove that, too. Braces and fillings normally aren’t a problem. You will be asked to change into a gown. Many clothing items contain metals that could potentially heat up and cause burns. Gowns are provided as well as secured lockers for valuables.

Notify your technologist if you have:

  • Any prosthetic joints, such as hip and/or knee
  • A heart pacemaker, defibrillator or an artificial heart valve
  • An intrauterine device (IUD)
  • Any metal plates, pins, screws, or surgical staples in your body
  • Any previous brain surgery
  • Tattoos and permanent makeup
  • A bullet or shrapnel in your body, had metal removed from your eye or ever worked around grinding metal
  • Any possibility that you may be pregnant or suspect you may be pregnant
  • Claustrophobia and require a sedative. Please ask your referring physician to prescribe one for you

In many cases, patients with a pacemaker cannot have an MRI (your technologist can verify if you have a ‘safe’ pacemaker). Metal used in orthopedic surgery poses no risk during an MRI (in most cases). You will also be asked if you have ever worked with metal. If there is a possibility of metal shrapnel in the eyes, you will be asked to undergo an x-ray prior to the MRI.

Some scans require the patient to receive an injection of gadolinium: a contrast medium. If this is the case, it will be discussed with you before the procedure. This contrast medium has a lower risk of allergic reaction or kidney damage compared to other mediums commonly used for CT scans. The amount of the contrast injected is determined by the patient’s weight.

During

What should I expect?

MRI is painless. Some patients may experience a “closed in” feeling, although in most cases, our wide- bore MRI scanners have alleviated this reaction. Plan on being with us for a minimum of 30 minutes, depending on the part of the body being scanned.  You will be asked to remain motionless during the actual imaging process. You will hear loud tapping or thumping during the exam. Earplugs or earphones and your choice of music will be provided, if you choose.

Depending on the part of the body being examined, a contrast material called gadolinium may be used to enhance the visibility of certain tissues or blood vessels. A small needle is placed in your arm or hand vein and a saline solution IV drip will run through the intravenous line to prevent clotting. About two-thirds of the way into your exam, the contrast material is injected.

After

You may return to normal activities as soon as the scan is complete. The radiologist will determine if there are any areas of concern in the internal organs or bone structures. The radiologist’s interpretation will then be available to your referring physician in approximately 48 hours after the exam. In most cases, your referring physician will discuss the results with you.

For more information on this topic, please visit: Radiologyinfo.org Cardiac MRI

MRI of the Small Intestine (Enterography)

MRI enterography is used to diagnose inflammation, bleeding, obstructions and other problems in the small intestine.

MRI uses radio waves and a strong magnetic field rather than x-rays, so there is no radiation involved.

Your MRI exam may or may not require an injection of contrast material called gadolinium. Patients are much less likely to be allergic to gadolinium contrast than to iodine contrast.

If the contrast agent is used, a technologist will insert an intravenous catheter (IV line) into a vein in your hand or arm. The contrast material will be injected into the IV line after an initial series of scans, then more images are taken.

Our wide-bore scanners allow for your comfort and calm. You will be placed into the magnet of the MRI unit. The technologist will perform the exam while working at a computer outside of the room and will be in contact with you throughout the exam.

Planning for your Enterography procedure

Special Note: Don’t eat or drink anything after midnight the night before your exam. You are permitted to have a small sip of water with any medications you need to take. You will be asked to arrive an hour before your exam to drink a liquid that will distend the bowel so it can be better visualized during the MRI. During the exam, you may be given an injection of contrast fluid called gadolinium.

Before
During
After
Before

MRI uses strong magnets, so it is important that you notify your doctor of any metal that may be implanted into your body. Jewelry should be left at home. If required, you’ll be asked to remove your watch, hearing aid, and other metal objects. Some makeup also contains traces of metal, so you might have to remove that, too. Braces and fillings normally aren’t a problem. You will be asked to change into a gown. Many clothing items contain metals that could potentially heat up and cause burns. Gowns are provided as well as secured lockers for valuables.

Notify your technologist if you have:

  • Any prosthetic joints, such as hip and/or knee
  • A heart pacemaker, defibrillator or an artificial heart valve
  • An intrauterine device (IUD)
  • Any metal plates, pins, screws, or surgical staples in your body
  • Any previous brain surgery
  • Tattoos and permanent makeup
  • A bullet or shrapnel in your body, had metal removed from your eye or ever worked around grinding metal
  • Any possibility that you may be pregnant or suspect you may be pregnant
  • Claustrophobia and require a sedative. Please ask your referring physician to prescribe one for you

In many cases, patients with a pacemaker cannot have an MRI (your technologist can verify if you have a ‘safe’ pacemaker). Metal used in orthopedic surgery poses no risk during an MRI (in most cases). You will also be asked if you have ever worked with metal. If there is a possibility of metal shrapnel in the eyes, you will be asked to undergo an x-ray prior to the MRI.

Some scans require the patient to receive an injection of gadolinium: a contrast medium. If this is the case, it will be discussed with you before the procedure. This contrast medium has a lower risk of allergic reaction or kidney damage compared to other mediums commonly used for CT scans. The amount of the contrast injected is determined by the patient’s weight.

During

What should I expect?

MRI is painless. Some patients may experience a “closed in” feeling, although in most cases, our wide- bore MRI scanners have alleviated this reaction. Plan on being with us for a minimum of 30 minutes, depending on the part of the body being scanned.  You will be asked to remain motionless during the actual imaging process. You will hear loud tapping or thumping during the exam. Earplugs or earphones and your choice of music will be provided, if you choose.

Depending on the part of the body being examined, a contrast material called gadolinium may be used to enhance the visibility of certain tissues or blood vessels. A small needle is placed in your arm or hand vein and a saline solution IV drip will run through the intravenous line to prevent clotting. About two-thirds of the way into your exam, the contrast material is injected.

After

You may return to normal activities as soon as the scan is complete. The radiologist will determine if there are any areas of concern in the internal organs or bone structures. The radiologist’s interpretation will then be available to your referring physician in approximately 48 hours after the exam. In most cases, your referring physician will discuss the results with you.

For more information on this topic, please visit: Radiologyinfo.org Small Intestine MRI (Enterography)

MRI of the Extremities (Musculoskeletal) 

MRI is frequently used to scan joints, soft tissues and bones. It is usually the best choice for evaluating the body for injuries, tumors, and degenerative disorders. MRI of the extremities is typically performed to diagnose or evaluate congenital abnormalities, joint disorders such as arthritis, tears in the ligaments and tendons, fractures, growths, spinal disk abnormalities, and sports-related or repetitive-motion injuries. The images are used to diagnose the cause of pain, swelling or bleeding in the tissues around joints and bones as well as to visualize tears and injuries, inflammation and infection.

MRI uses radio waves and a strong magnetic field rather than x-rays, so there is no radiation involved.

Your MRI exam may or may not require an injection of contrast material called gadolinium. Patients are much less likely to be allergic to gadolinium contrast than to iodine contrast.

If the contrast agent is used, a technologist will insert an intravenous catheter (IV line) into a vein in your hand or arm. The contrast material will be injected into the IV line after an initial series of scans, then more images are taken.

Our wide-bore scanners allow for your comfort and calm. You will be placed into the magnet of the MRI unit. The technologist will perform the exam while working at a computer outside of the room and will be in contact with you throughout the exam.

Planning for your MRI of the Extremities procedure

Before
During
After
Before

MRI uses strong magnets, so it is important that you notify your doctor of any metal that may be implanted into your body. Jewelry should be left at home. If required, you’ll be asked to remove your watch, hearing aid, and other metal objects. Some makeup also contains traces of metal, so you might have to remove that, too. Braces and fillings normally aren’t a problem. You will be asked to change into a gown. Many clothing items contain metals that could potentially heat up and cause burns. Gowns are provided as well as secured lockers for valuables.

Notify your technologist if you have:

  • Any prosthetic joints, such as hip and/or knee
  • A heart pacemaker, defibrillator or an artificial heart valve
  • An intrauterine device (IUD)
  • Any metal plates, pins, screws, or surgical staples in your body
  • Any previous brain surgery
  • Tattoos and permanent makeup
  • A bullet or shrapnel in your body, had metal removed from your eye or ever worked around grinding metal
  • Any possibility that you may be pregnant or suspect you may be pregnant
  • Claustrophobia and require a sedative. Please ask your referring physician to prescribe one for you

In many cases, patients with a pacemaker cannot have an MRI (your technologist can verify if you have a ‘safe’ pacemaker). Metal used in orthopedic surgery poses no risk during an MRI (in most cases). You will also be asked if you have ever worked with metal. If there is a possibility of metal shrapnel in the eyes, you will be asked to undergo an x-ray prior to the MRI.

Some scans require the patient to receive an injection of gadolinium: a contrast medium. If this is the case, it will be discussed with you before the procedure. This contrast medium has a lower risk of allergic reaction or kidney damage compared to other mediums commonly used for CT scans. The amount of the contrast injected is determined by the patient’s weight.

During

What should I expect?

MRI is painless. Some patients may experience a “closed in” feeling, although in most cases, our wide- bore MRI scanners have alleviated this reaction. Plan on being with us for a minimum of 30 minutes, depending on the part of the body being scanned.  You will be asked to remain motionless during the actual imaging process. You will hear loud tapping or thumping during the exam. Earplugs or earphones and your choice of music will be provided, if you choose.

Depending on the part of the body being examined, a contrast material called gadolinium may be used to enhance the visibility of certain tissues or blood vessels. A small needle is placed in your arm or hand vein and a saline solution IV drip will run through the intravenous line to prevent clotting. About two-thirds of the way into your exam, the contrast material is injected.

After

You may return to normal activities as soon as the scan is complete. The radiologist will determine if there are any areas of concern in the internal organs or bone structures. The radiologist’s interpretation will then be available to your referring physician in approximately 48 hours after the exam. In most cases, your referring physician will discuss the results with you.

For more information on this topic, please visit: Radiologyinfo.org  Musculoskeletal MRI

MRI of the Spine

MRI of the spine allows the radiologist to examine the spine’s anatomy and alignment to diagnose or rule out structural abnormalities or injuries as well as to determine the causes of back pain, leg pain, and numbness, inflammation and infection. MRI can also detect a bulging, degenerated or herniated intervertebral disc. The exam is often performed to help plan procedures or surgeries of the spine as well as for post-operative follow-up and monitoring.

MRI uses radio waves and a strong magnetic field rather than x-rays, so there is no radiation involved.

Your MRI exam may or may not require an injection of contrast material called gadolinium. Patients are much less likely to be allergic to gadolinium contrast than to iodine contrast.

If the contrast agent is used, a technologist will insert an intravenous catheter (IV line) into a vein in your hand or arm. The contrast material will be injected into the IV line after an initial series of scans, then more images are taken.

Our wide-bore scanners allow for your comfort and calm. You will be placed into the magnet of the MRI unit. The technologist will perform the exam while working at a computer outside of the room and will be in contact with you throughout the exam.

Planning for your MRI of the Spine procedure

Before
During
After
Before

MRI uses strong magnets, so it is important that you notify your doctor of any metal that may be implanted into your body. Jewelry should be left at home. If required, you’ll be asked to remove your watch, hearing aid, and other metal objects. Some makeup also contains traces of metal, so you might have to remove that, too. Braces and fillings normally aren’t a problem. You will be asked to change into a gown. Many clothing items contain metals that could potentially heat up and cause burns. Gowns are provided as well as secured lockers for valuables.

Notify your technologist if you have:

  • Any prosthetic joints, such as hip and/or knee
  • A heart pacemaker, defibrillator or an artificial heart valve
  • An intrauterine device (IUD)
  • Any metal plates, pins, screws, or surgical staples in your body
  • Any previous brain surgery
  • Tattoos and permanent makeup
  • A bullet or shrapnel in your body, had metal removed from your eye or ever worked around grinding metal
  • Any possibility that you may be pregnant or suspect you may be pregnant
  • Claustrophobia and require a sedative. Please ask your referring physician to prescribe one for you

In many cases, patients with a pacemaker cannot have an MRI (your technologist can verify if you have a ‘safe’ pacemaker). Metal used in orthopedic surgery poses no risk during an MRI (in most cases). You will also be asked if you have ever worked with metal. If there is a possibility of metal shrapnel in the eyes, you will be asked to undergo an x-ray prior to the MRI.

Some scans require the patient to receive an injection of gadolinium: a contrast medium. If this is the case, it will be discussed with you before the procedure. This contrast medium has a lower risk of allergic reaction or kidney damage compared to other mediums commonly used for CT scans. The amount of the contrast injected is determined by the patient’s weight.

During

What should I expect?

MRI is painless. Some patients may experience a “closed in” feeling, although in most cases, our wide- bore MRI scanners have alleviated this reaction. Plan on being with us for a minimum of 30 minutes, depending on the part of the body being scanned.  You will be asked to remain motionless during the actual imaging process. You will hear loud tapping or thumping during the exam. Earplugs or earphones and your choice of music will be provided, if you choose.

Depending on the part of the body being examined, a contrast material called gadolinium may be used to enhance the visibility of certain tissues or blood vessels. A small needle is placed in your arm or hand vein and a saline solution IV drip will run through the intravenous line to prevent clotting. About two-thirds of the way into your exam, the contrast material is injected.

After

You may return to normal activities as soon as the scan is complete. The radiologist will determine if there are any areas of concern in the internal organs or bone structures. The radiologist’s interpretation will then be available to your referring physician in approximately 48 hours after the exam. In most cases, your referring physician will discuss the results with you.

For more information on this topic, please visit: Radiologyinfo.org  Spine MRI